happiness-formula

The Happiness Formula?

The search for happiness is the greatest search of all. Numerous philosophers, artists, poets, writers, and creatives tried to answer the greatest question of them all: “What is happiness and how to achieve it?”. We all want to be happy; everything we do in life is directed to that one goal: achieving happiness. But is there a happiness formula that, if you follow it, you’ll finally get to your goal? Well… yes and no.

Seligman’s Happiness Formula

Seligman came up with the idea that happiness is the sum of someone’s genetic capacities, voluntary control, and their circumstances.  He emphasizes that person’s circumstances don’t have a significant impact on their happiness. This means that, although it often looks like that we’ll be happier with the new car or more money, it actually doesn’t have a high impact on our happiness in the long run. Seligman doesn’t say this out of the blue: research constantly shows that people have a “baseline of happiness” that stays the same no matter the life circumstances. But does this mean that we cannot have an impact on our happiness? Not exactly. Seligman says that voluntary control over our happiness has the most powerful effect on it. In other words, we can “learn” to be happier.

To achieve greater happiness, positive-psychology advocates “learnt optimism” exercises, such as sitting down each evening and listing things that went well that day; learning to feel grateful for what we have; and practicing random acts of kindness. Seligman also points out that lasting happiness has nothing to do with the hedonistic pleasures – shopping and partying – and more to do with solid values: a sense of community and meaningful work.

On the other hand, there is no specified set of rules that you can follow, as we’re all different. However, these are some ways that can help you be more satisfied and happy with your life.

good-marriage

Nine Psychological Tasks for a Good Marriage

Research on what makes a marriage work shows that people in a good marriage have completed these psychological “tasks”. If your marriage doesn’t appear to check any of these boxes, you may want to have a look for a Divorce Lawyer that could come in handy for you at some point.

1. Emotional Independence from Primary Family

Separated emotionally from the family you grew up in; not to the point of estrangement, but enough so that your identity is separate from that of your parents and siblings.

2. “Together” Space and “Me” Space

Build togetherness based on a shared intimacy and identity, while at the same time set boundaries to protect each partner’s autonomy.

3. Sex

Establish a rich and pleasurable sexual relationship. Work together to protect it from the intrusions of the workplace and family obligations.

4. Staying a Happy Couple With Children

For couples with children, embrace your roles as parents and absorb the impact of a baby’s entrance into the marriage. Learn to continue the work of protecting the privacy of you and your spouse as a couple.

5. Together Through the Good and Through the Bad

Confront and master the inevitable crises of life together. Learn to cooperate when times are hard instead of blaming each other.

6. Your Marriage is Your Safe Place

Maintain the strength of the marital bond in the face of adversity. Marriage should be a safe haven in which partners are able to express their differences, anger, and conflict.

7. Laugh

Use humor and laughter to keep things in perspective and to avoid boredom and isolation.

8. Support

Nurture and comfort each other, satisfying each partner’s needs for dependency and offering continuing encouragement and support.

9. Keep the Spark

Keep alive the early romantic, idealized images of falling in love, while facing the sober realities of the changes wrought by time.