motivation

A Fresh Re-Start

So you’ve been slacking on your new year’s resolution; who hasn’t? The question now is: are you going to make the necessary changes to achieve your goals? Remember, a positive mindset is required with the ambition to do more. Here, we will work on the times when doubt creeps into your mind and you find yourself loosing your motivation, slacking again. So even as the snow thaws out and the flowers start to bloom, note if your new year’s resolutions are starting to dwindle in your mind. Let’s take this post to reflect on the reasons why we chose those goals and how we can stick to achieving them in the coming months.

How Do You Speak About your Goals?

Let’s first look at how you articulated our goals to others. Did you scream it from the rooftop after too much champagne? Or maybe you scribbled it in the sand before the tide came in? Either way, you found some way to tell others what your goals are for this year. But after that night, did you write them out somewhere? A place you know you would read them? Because something as simple as writing on a blank page and posting it on the wall can go a long way toward helping you reach that goal, one day at a time.

Another effective method, that puts more accountability on your actions, is using an agenda. Did you reach your milestones in the time you allotted yourself?

Whichever method you decide to use, just make sure you stay aware of both: where you want to be and when you want to be there. Try to repeat the goal over and over to yourself, take the time to listen to what you are saying. This technique can up your stakes on your goals, by helping you dig deep and finding the real motivators behind them.

 

How to Motivate Yourself

Visualizing what you want to accomplish is important for motivation. Did you want to exercise to fit into those skinny jeans? Or did you want to give your doctor less concern about cholesterol levels? Take a few days to really listen to what the foundation is for your goals. Something you can do to help determine motivation is weighing the pros and cons of your thought process on making these changes: What am I gaining? What am I avoiding?

Motivating factors can be described as:

1      Fear: “If you don’t do the dishes you’re not going out tonight!”

2      Incentive: “If you meet your sales quota this month you’ll get a $1000 bonus on your paycheck”

3      Intrinsic (attitude/internal): “I complete this 5km run because doing so gives me a sense of accomplishment – and I know it’s good for my physical and mental health.”

By now you should start getting a clearer picture of where your goals are being formulated. Have you found something you’re passionate about? Is there something you know you have been putting off for years? Use this awareness to embracing your purpose for this year. I am not trying to make you uncomfortable by overwhelming you with an overarching reason for your actions, but rather trying to draw out some accountability about how you act towards your goal. As these actions are rooted in how your goals are presented to you, both internally and externally.

Internal (intrinsic) vs. External (extrinsic) Motivation:

●    Internal motivation comes from the fulfillment of self-gratification

●    External motivation comes from outside the learner in the forms of tangible rewards and punishments such as competition, grades, awards, promotion, pay, etc.

 Where to begin?

If you’d like to inquire about goal setting and motivation treatment and help in Mississauga or Bradford Ontario at Real Life Counselling, don’t hesitate to call us at 289-231-8479.

 

 

References

Taylor, J. (2013). Personal Growth: Motivation: The Drive to Change. Psychology Today. Retrieved from: http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-power-prime/201201/personal-growth-motivation-the-drive-change

N.A. (2013) NALD: BDAA. Canada’s Literacy and Essential Skills Network. Retrieved from: www.nald.ca/adultlearningcourse/glossary.htm

Ham, V., Davey, R., Fenaughty, J. (2013). Proceedings from the 16th International Conference on Thinking (ICOT). International Conference on Thinking. Retrieved from: http://icot2013.core-ed.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Proceedings-ICOT-2013.pdf#page=181

 

New Year's Resolutions

Are You Still Going Strong on Your New Year’s Resolutions?

So you made some New Year’s resolutions. This time you’ll save more money, or lose weight, or drink more water, or not stress so much or… whatever decision you made to improve your life. You are so determined to stick to them, because THIS time, you won’t quit; you’ll make it. This time is different! And, after a few weeks, you start slacking until, little by little, you give up and go back to your old habits. Does this scenario sound familiar?

If you gave up on your New Year’s resolutions don’t feel bad. Research found that 80% of people fail to stick to their New Year’s resolutions for more than about a month and a half. But why are we so bad at it? It’s because we’re all human, and we all struggle with doing what we should do vs. doing what we enjoy doing. Moreover, we easily fall into “False Hope Syndrome”. In other words, we often underestimate the likely speed, amount, ease and consequences of changing our behavior. Finally, overthinking is maybe #1 enemy to sticking to your resolutions.

So, instead of falling into the same trap again, it’s time to start the year off right. You need the real plan of action; not just the plain “decision” that’s nothing more than a wish. Call today 289-231-8479 to book your appointment and create your own life plan.

References:

http://www.iflscience.com/brain/psychology-new-year-s-resolutions/

http://www.businessinsider.com/the-psychology-behind-why-we-cant-keep-new-years-resolutions-2018-1